Readings

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_accordion active_tab=”1″ collapsible=”yes”][vc_accordion_tab title=”Child and Youth Care Politized Praxis”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”209″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”September 14, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fcyc541.website%2F2015%2F09%2F06%2Fwhat-worlds-might-be-possible-through-a-cyc-political-praxis-2%2F||”][vc_column_text]de Finney, S., Little, J. N., Skott-Myhre, H., & Gharabaghi, K. (2012). Roundtable: Conversations on conversing in child and youth care. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 2- 3: 128-145.

 

White, J. (2015). An Ethos For The Times: Difference, Imagination, And The Unknown Future In Child And Youth Care. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 6(4), 498-515.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”The Construction of Childhood and Youth throughout History”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”198″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”September 21, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]Brickell, C. (2013). On the case of youth: Case files, case studies, and the social construction of adolescence. The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, 6(1), 50-80.

Ekberg, M. (2007). The old eugenics and the new genetics compared. Social history of medicine, 20(3), 581-593.

Heath, M. B. (2014). Recycled Stories: Historicizing Play Today Through the Late Nineteenth-Century Anglo-American Play Movement. The Journal of the History of Childhood and Youth, 7(1), 107-133.

Mills, S., & Kraftl, P. (Eds.). (2014). Informal education, childhood and youth: Geographies, histories, practices. Palgrave Macmillan.

Gleason, M. (2001). Disciplining the student body: schooling and the construction of Canadian children’s bodies, 1930–1960. History of Education Quarterly, 41(2), 189-215.

Gleason, M. (2006). Between education and memory: Health and childhood in English-Canada, 1900-1950. Scientia Canadensis: Canadian Journal of the History of Science, Technology and MedicineScientia Canadensis:/Revue canadienne d’histoire des sciences, des techniques et de la médecine, 29(1), 49-72.

Gleason, M. (2009). In Search of History’s Child. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 1(2), 125-135.

Strong-Boag, V. (2007). “Children of Adversity”: Disabilities and Child Welfare in Canada from the Nineteenth to the Twenty-First Century. Journal of Family History, 32(4), 413-432.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][/vc_accordion][vc_accordion active_tab=”1″ collapsible=”yes”][vc_accordion_tab title=”Reconfiguring Discourses of Childhood”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”196″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”Week 3: September 28, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fcyc541.website%2F2015%2F09%2F06%2Fwhat-worlds-might-be-possible-through-a-cyc-political-praxis-2%2F||”][vc_column_text]

Burman, E. (2013). Conceptual resources for questioning ‘child as educator’. Studies in philosophy and education, 32(3), 229-243.

Kraftl, P. (2015). Alter-Childhoods: Biopolitics and Childhoods in Alternative Education Spaces. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 105(1), 219-237.

Millei, Z., & Cliff, K. (2014). The preschool bathroom: making ‘problem bodies’ and the limit of the disciplinary regime over children. British Journal of Sociology of Education, 35(2), 244-262.

 

Taylor, A. (2011). Reconceptualizing the ‘nature’of childhood. Childhood, 18(4), 420-433.

 

Tesar, M. (2014). Reconceptualising the Child: power and resistance within early childhood settings. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 15(4), 360-367.

Wyness, M. (2013). Global standards and deficit childhoods: the contested meaning of children’s participation. Children’s Geographies, 11(3), 340-353.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Indigenous Childhoods and Youth”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”180″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”Week 4 : October 5″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]de Finney, S. (2015). Playing Indian and other settler stories: disrupting Western narratives of Indigenous girlhood. Continuum, 29(2), 169-181.

 

De Leeuw, S. (2009). ‘If anything is to be done with the Indian, we must catch him very young’: colonial constructions of Aboriginal children and the geographies of Indian residential schooling in British Columbia, Canada. Children’s Geographies, 7(2), 123-140.

Korteweg, L., & Russell, C. (2012). Editorial: Decolonizing+ indigenizing= moving environmental education towards reconciliation. Canadian Journal of Environmental Education (CJEE), 17, 5-14.

Taylor, A. (2010). Troubling childhood innocence: Reframing the debate over the media sexualisation of children.

 

Van Krieken, R. (1999). TheStolen Generations’ and Cultural Genocide The Forced Removal of Australian Indigenous Children from their Families and its Implications for the Sociology of Childhood. Childhood, 6(3), 297-311.

Zinga, D. (2012). Journeying With Youth: Re-Centering Indigeneity in Child and Youth Care. Child & Youth Services, 33(3-4), 258-280.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][/vc_accordion][vc_accordion active_tab=”1″ collapsible=”yes”][vc_accordion_tab title=”Racialized, Gendered and Sexualized Childhoods”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”136″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”Week 5: October 19, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fcyc541.website%2F2015%2F09%2F06%2Fwhat-worlds-might-be-possible-through-a-cyc-political-praxis-2%2F||”][vc_column_text]Baird, B. (2008). Child politics, feminist analyses. Australian Feminist Studies, 23(57), 291-305.

Burman, E. (2012). Between identification and subjectification: affective technologies of expertise and temporality in the contemporary cultural representation of gendered childhoods. Pedagogy, Culture & Society, 20(2), 295-315.

Burman, E. (2015). Knowing Foucault, knowing you: ‘raced’/classed and gendered subjectivities in the pedagogical state. Pedagogy, Culture & Society, (ahead-of-print), 1-25.

Burman, E., & Stacey, J. (2010). The child and childhood in feminist theory. Feminist Theory, 11(3), 227-240.

Di Chiro, G. (2014). Applying a Feminist Critique to Environmental Education. Australian Journal of Environmental Education, 30(01), 9-16.

Lesnik-Oberstein, K. (2010). Childhood, queer theory, and feminism. Feminist Theory, 11(3), 309-321.

Pomerantz, S. (2009). Between a Rock and a Hard Place: Un/Defining the” Girl”. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 1(2), 147-158.

Robinson, K. H., & Davies, C. (2008). ‘SHE’S KICKIN’ASS, THAT’S WHAT SHE’S DOING!’ Deconstructing Childhood ‘Innocence’in Media Representations. Australian Feminist Studies, 23(57), 343-358.

Taylor, A. (2010). Troubling childhood innocence: Reframing the debate over the media sexualisation of children.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Reconfiguring Youth Discourses”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”163″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”Week 6: October 26, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]de Finney, S. (2010). “We Just Don’t Know Each Other”: Racialised Girls Negotiate Mediated Multiculturalism in a Less Diverse Canadian City. Journal of Intercultural Studies, 31(5), 471-487.

Horton, J., Christensen, P., Kraftl, P., & Hadfield-Hill, S. (2014). ‘Walking… just walking’: how children and young people’s everyday pedestrian practices matter. Social & Cultural Geography, 15(1), 94-115.

Kelly, P. and Kamp, A. (2015) 21st Century Hinterlands. In: A Critical Youth Studies for the 21st Century. Pp. 1-14.

Owen, S. (2014). Framing Narratives of Social Media, Risk and Youth Transitions: government of ‘not yet’citizens of technologically advanced nations. Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 235-246.

Passanante Elman, J. (2014) Introduction. Chronic Youth: Disability, Secuality, and US Media Cultures of Rehabilitation. New York University Press. Pp. 1-27

Sukarieh, M. and Tannock, S. (2015) Chapter 1 – The Neoliberal Embrace of Youth. In: Youth Rising? The Politics of Youth in the Global Economy. Taylor & Francis. Pp. 12-32.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][/vc_accordion][vc_accordion active_tab=”1″ collapsible=”yes”][vc_accordion_tab title=”Children/Youth and Nation Building”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”95″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”Week 6: November 2, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fcyc541.website%2F2015%2F09%2F06%2Fwhat-worlds-might-be-possible-through-a-cyc-political-praxis-2%2F||”][vc_column_text]Banerjee, B. (2013). Utopian Transformations in the Contact Zone: A Posthuman, Postcolonial Reading of Shaun Tan and John Marsden’s The Rabbits. Global Studies of Childhood, 3(4), 418-426.

Burman, E. (2011). Deconstructing neoliberal childhood: towards a feminist antipsychological approach. Childhood, 19(4), 423-438.

Duhn, I. (2014). Being and Becoming Cosmopolitan in Early Childhood Curriculum: ‘roots’, ‘wings’ and cosmopolitan citizenship. Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 224-234.

Kraftl, P. (2015). Alter-Childhoods: Biopolitics and Childhoods in Alternative Education Spaces. Annals of the Association of American Geographers, 105(1), 219-237.

Lancy, D. F. (2015). Children as a reserve labor force. Current Anthropology.

Somerville, M. (2014). Entangled Objects in the Cultural Politics of Childhood and Nation. Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 183-194.

Taylor, A. (2014). Settler Children, Kangaroos and the Cultural Politics of Australian National Belonging. Global Studies of Childhood, 4(3), 169-182.

Wasiak, J. The Development of Development: A Post-Marxist Analysis of the Development of Hegemonic Developmental Psychology. Annual Review of Critical Psychology, 118-125.   [/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Global and Postcolonial Childhoods/Youth”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”159″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”You might choose to read these texts” google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]Hart, J. (2006). The Politics of Child Soldiers, The. Brown J. World Aff. 13, 217.

Montgomery, H. (2011). Rumours of Child Trafficking after Natural Disasters: Fact, fiction or fantasy? Journal of Children and Media, 5(4), 395-410.

Steffler, M. (2009). The production and use of the globalized child: Canadian literary and political contexts. Jeunesse: Young People, Texts, Cultures, 1(2), 109-124.

Viruru, R. (2008). Childhood Labor in India: issues and complexities. Contemporary Issues in Early Childhood, 9(3), 224-233.Viruru, R. (2005). The impact of postcolonial theory on early childhood education. Journal of Education, 35(1), 7-29.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][/vc_accordion][vc_accordion active_tab=”1″ collapsible=”yes”][vc_accordion_tab title=”Reconfiguring Child and Youth Care Discourses”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”136″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”Week 8: November 16, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fcyc541.website%2F2015%2F09%2F06%2Fwhat-worlds-might-be-possible-through-a-cyc-political-praxis-2%2F||”][vc_column_text]

Skott-Myhre, K., & Skott-Myhre, H. Towards a radical ethics of care. Journal of Child and Youth Care Work. 228-242.   

Skott-Myhre, H. (2012). Fleeing Identity: Toward a Revolutionary Politics of Relationship. Child & Youth Services, 33(3-4), 329-344.

Skott-Myhre, K., & Skott-Myhre, H. A. (2011). Theorizing and Applying Child and Youth Care Praxis as Politics of Care. Relational Child & Youth Care Practice, 24(1-2).

Skott-Myhre, K. (2012). Nomadic youth care. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 3(2-3), 300-315.

Skott-Myhre, K., & Skott-Myhre, H. A. (2015). REVOLUTIONARY LOVE: CYC AND THE IMPORTANCE OF RECLAIMING OUR DESIRE. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 6(4), 581-594.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2014). Mapping CYC: Part I. CYC-Online, 186, 16-19.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2013). Towards a critical child and youth care-II. CYC-Online, 168, 19-22.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2014). Mapping CYC: Part III. CYC-Online, 188, 15-18.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2013). Beyond development: Towards a critical Child and Youth Care. CYC-Online, 167, 27-30.

Skott-Myhre,H. (2014). Relational ecologies: What is at stake. CYC-Online, 183, 17-21.

Skott-Myhre, Hans. (2013). CYC and Relationship in the 21st Century. CYC-Online (2013), Issue 175.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2015). Notes on caring under the society of control. CYC-Online, 198, 40-43.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2012). The question of doors. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 3(2-3), 316-330.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Week 9 – November 23, 2015 – Risky/ing Sensing: Licked Sound, Hearing Cold, and Lumpy Vision”][vc_column_text]This is an interactive workshop facilitated by Emily Coon, Nicole Land, & Narda Nelson.

Risky/ing Sensing: Licked Sound, Hearing Cold, and Lumpy Vision

 This workshop takes seriously the politics of sensing, experimenting with questions of attending and attuning to difference, contestation, nomadism, relationality, and permeability in sensing (Barad, 2012; Bird Rose, Cooke, & van Dooren, 2011; Tuck & Ree, 2013). “Can you hear Drum?”; “Feel how soft this feather is”; “I see your body is moving quickly” – echoing with the certainty of dominant Euro-Western epistemologies, sensing masquerades as ‘the Five Senses’ amid Canadian early childhood education. Sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste interrupt, supervise, and dictate sensory engagements for educator, children, and non-human bodies, sanitizing sensorality of any enchanting disobedience from colonial conceptions of sensing rooted in developmental rhetoric. Hierarchy, strict separation, and a prescribed quantity of senses cohere as the flavor of five-sense sensing, squeezing sensorality toward violent and mechanical epistemological spaces of stability and oppression. Nourished through their allegiance to coloniality, dominant conceptions mark sensing as profoundly political.

Even as the mechanized and oppressive body-logics of dominant Euro-Western bio-politics perch their bulk upon the sensory potential of the body, sensing escapes containment (Braidotti, 2006; Kind, 2010; Watts, 2013). Sensorality exerts resistance as affect, movement, contagion, tension, vibration, and permeability, persistently rupturing, mingling, and mattering in early childhood education. This resistance, we will argue, is not only intensely political and thus of pedagogical import, but also infused with difference and entangled with questions of caring, ethics, and relationality. This workshop will think with the relational, nomadic, and contested potentiality of sensing in early childhood education (Grosz, 2008; Simpson 2011; van Dooren, 2011): what becomes possible if we risk refusing the impulse to subsume sensing to only five categories? How might non-prescriptive sensory entanglements begin to transform (in) our engagements with children? Together with participants, we will (re)imagine how sensing might be conceptualized as relational, emergent, and fleeting, whereby to sense at all is to be attuned to, and affected by, nomadic sensory knowledges that reveal how artificial, colonial, and dangerous inviting only sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste into early childhood education might be.

Crows, shoulders, and deer hide: animal chatterings, muscular effort, and vibrational more-than-human connectivity – this workshop will engage with multispecies relations, flesh, and Drum to think with senses/ing that might emerge when sensory difference oscillates as pedagogical joy, risk, and generosity. Here, sensory difference goes beyond pathological deviation from five-sense sensing towards infusing such a lack-dependent dictate with the supple, fractal, and productive difference of affective sensory entanglements. This workshop will provoke participants to imagine what sensing, no longer trapped in the confines of five-sense sensing, might become in early childhood education (Pacini-Ketchabaw, 2012, 2013; Taylor & Blaise, 2014). What ethical and pedagogical possibilities for sensorality might emerge as sensing unfurls itself toward the mysteries of crows, shoulders, and Drum? What happens when we refuse to ask children if they can hear Drum, feel crows, or see bodies and instead engage with the colonial politics, fleshy realities, and (in)visibility of nomadic sensory epistemologies, as sight, sound, touch, smell, and taste dissolve into the difference-infused folds of an entangled sensorality?

Format and Provisions for Audience Engagement

            This highly interactive workshop will employ both a wide variety of multi-media technologies, including the sharing of digital images, collages, video, and sound clips, and an assortment of materials with which participants will engage. Material and multi-media provocations will be combined with theoretical prompts from early childhood, feminist new materialism(s), decolonization, embodiment, and multispecies literature. Taken together with multi-media provocations, workshop participants will experiment with a range of materials, entering into relations with these materials such that together, we might disrupt, translate, or transform our momentary engagements with sensing and sensorality. 

References

Barad, K. (2007). Meeting the universe halfway: Quantum physics and the entanglement of matter and meaning. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Barad, K. (2011). Nature’s queer performativity. Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences, 19(2), 121–158.

Barad, K. (2012). On touching—The inhuman therefore I am. differences, 23(3), 206–223.

Bird Rose, D., Cooke, S., & van Dooren, T. (2011). Ravens at play. Cultural Studies Review, 17(2), 326-343.

Braidotti, R. (2006). Transpositions: On nomadic ethics. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.

Braidotti, R. (2013). The posthuman. Malden, MA: Polity Press.

Deleuze, G., & Guattari, F. (1987). A thousand plateaus: Capitalism and schizophrenia. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Grosz, E. (2008). Chaos, territory, art: Deleuze and the framing of the earth. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Haraway, D. (1991). Simians, cyborgs, and women: The reinvention of nature. New York, NY: Routledge.

Haraway, D. (2008). When species meet. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Kind, S. (2010). Art encounters: Movements in the visual arts and early childhood education. In V. Pacini-Ketchabaw (Ed.), Flows, rhythms, and intensities of early childhood education curriculum (pp. 113–132). New York, NY: Peter Lang.

Kirby, V. (1997). Telling flesh: The substance of the corporeal. New York, NY: Routledge.

Lenz Taguchi, H. (2013). Images of thinking in feminist materialisms: ontological divergences and the production of researcher subjectivities. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 26(6), 706-716.

Mazzei, L. A. (2010). Thinking data with Deleuze. International Journal of Qualitative Studies in Education, 23(5), 511-523.

Mol, A. (2002). The body multiple: Ontology in medical practice. Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Pacini-Ketchabaw, V. (2012). Postcolonial entanglements: Unruling stories. Child & Youth Services, 33(3), 303-316.

Pacini-Ketchabaw, V. (2013). Politicizing transitions in early childhood. Global Studies of Childhood, 3(3), 221-229.

Serres, M. (2008). The five senses. (M. Sankey & P. Cowley, Trans.), New York, NY: Continuum International Publishing Group. (Original work published 1985)

Simpson, L. (2011). Dancing on our turtle’s back: Stories of Nishnaabeg re-creation, resurgence and a new emergence. Winnipeg, MB: Arbeiter Ring Publishing.

Simpson, L. (2013). Islands of decolonial love. Winnipeg, MB: ARP Books.

Taylor, A., & Blaise, M. (2014). Queer worlding childhood. Discourse: Studies in the Cultural Politics of Education, 35(3), 377-392.

Tuana, K. (2008). Viscous porosity: Witnessing Katrina. In S. Alaimo & S. Hekman (Eds.), Material feminisms (pp. 188–213). Bloomington, IN: Indiana University Press.

Tuck, E., & Ree, C. (2013). A glossary of haunting. In S. Holman-Jones, T. E. Adams, & C. Ellis (Eds.), Handbook of Autoethnography (p. 639-658). SAGE Publications.

van Dooren, T., & Bird Rose, D. (2012). Storied places in a multispecies city. Humanimalia. 3(2), 1-27.

van Dooren, T. (2014). Flight ways: Life and loss at the edge of extinction. New York, NY: Columbia University Press.

Voegelin, S. (2012). Ethics of listening. Journal of Sonic Studies, 2(1). Retrieved from http://journal.sonicstudies.org/vol02/nr01/a07

Voegelin, S. (2014). Sonic possible worlds: Hearing the continuum of sound. New York, NY: Bloomsbury Academic.

Watts, V. (2013). Indigenous place-thought & agency amongst humans and non-humans (First Woman and Sky Woman go on a European world tour!). Decolonization: Indigeneity, Education & Society, 2(1), 20-34.

 

 

[/vc_column_text][/vc_accordion_tab][vc_accordion_tab title=”Guest: Dr. Hans Skott-Myhre”][vc_row_inner][vc_column_inner width=”1/4″][vc_single_image image=”151″ style=”vc_box_rounded”][/vc_column_inner][vc_column_inner width=”3/4″][vc_custom_heading text=”Week 10: November 30, 2015″ google_fonts=”font_family:Montserrat%3Aregular%2C700|font_style:400%20regular%3A400%3Anormal”][vc_column_text]Same as Week 8 (Novemeber 16th) articles:

Skott-Myhre, K., & Skott-Myhre, H. Towards a radical ethics of care. Journal of Child and Youth Care Work. 228-242.   

Skott-Myhre, H. (2012). Fleeing Identity: Toward a Revolutionary Politics of Relationship. Child & Youth Services, 33(3-4), 329-344.

Skott-Myhre, K., & Skott-Myhre, H. A. (2011). Theorizing and Applying Child and Youth Care Praxis as Politics of Care. Relational Child & Youth Care Practice, 24(1-2).

Skott-Myhre, K. (2012). Nomadic youth care. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 3(2-3), 300-315.

Skott-Myhre, K., & Skott-Myhre, H. A. (2015). REVOLUTIONARY LOVE: CYC AND THE IMPORTANCE OF RECLAIMING OUR DESIRE. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 6(4), 581-594.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2014). Mapping CYC: Part I. CYC-Online, 186, 16-19.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2013). Towards a critical child and youth care-II. CYC-Online, 168, 19-22.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2014). Mapping CYC: Part III. CYC-Online, 188, 15-18.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2013). Beyond development: Towards a critical Child and Youth Care. CYC-Online, 167, 27-30.

Skott-Myhre,H. (2014). Relational ecologies: What is at stake. CYC-Online, 183, 17-21.

Skott-Myhre, Hans. (2013). CYC and Relationship in the 21st Century. CYC-Online (2013), Issue 175.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2015). Notes on caring under the society of control. CYC-Online, 198, 40-43.

Skott-Myhre, H. (2012). The question of doors. International Journal of Child, Youth and Family Studies, 3(2-3), 316-330.[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”Library Course Reserve” style=”flat” color=”juicy-pink” link=”url:http%3A%2F%2Fwww.uvic.ca%2Flibrary%2Ffind%2Freserves%2Findex.php||target:%20_blank”][/vc_column_inner][/vc_row_inner][/vc_accordion_tab][/vc_accordion][/vc_column][/vc_row]